{ Sweet & Spicy BBQ Ribs }

August 18, 2014

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When it comes to my barbeque, I’m an Eastern North Carolina purist. I believe that the hallowed pulled pork meat should only be basted and sauced in a vinegar and red pepper sauce, and nothing anyone says will convince me otherwise. When it comes to other forms of slow cooked meat, however, I’m a little more open. For instance, on my pork ribs I love nothing more than caramelized brown sugar and a heavy dose of cayenne.

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Recently I spent a day in Raleigh with my Great Uncle Ted and his wife Ann, my great aunt. Ted is my grandmother’s brother, and we were talking about his childhood growing up in Wake County for the Tasting North Carolina series. We talked about our family, his parents and their families, his favorite foods, and his life growing up in North Carolina. We decided on a pound cake recipe from his mother, Flossie, for Wake, but he also shared his famous rib sauce recipe with me and it was too much to pass up.

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When I make ribs I usually do a spice and brown sugar dry rub and allow the sugar to melt and the spices to blend with the smoke from the grill over the course of many hours. Finished with Ted’s sauce (adapted to make it a bit spicier), the ribs were sweet and smoky, crisp and saucy, melt in your mouth perfection. Since we made these a few weeks ago I’ve been wanting ribs all day, every day. I even convinced Dan that making them on a Thursday was totally reasonable even though it meant eating at midnight. I would say that he’s a trooper but, come on, he got ribs.

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This post is sponsored by the North Carolina Pork Council.

1 rack of pork ribs

dry rub:

2 cups brown sugar

2 tbsp chipotle

2 tbsp cayenne pepper

1 tbsp garlic powder

1 tbsp salt

1 tsp powdered ginger

sauce:

2 cups fresh or canned tomato puree

1/4 cup brown sugar

1 tbsp chipotle

1 tsp cayenne pepper

Juice of 1 lemon

Heat your grill to approximately 325F. Mix together brown sugar and spices of dry rub. Wrap a baking sheet in tin foil and place the ribs meat-side up. Rub half of the sugar and spice mix into the meat and then flip over so the meat is touching the pan. Top the bone-side of the ribs with the remaining sugar/spice mix.  Cover loosely with tin foil and place on the grill. Grill 3-3 1/2 hours or until the meat has shrunk away from the bones and easily peels off.

While the ribs are cooking combine tomatoes, sugar, spices, and lemon juice in a sauce pan. Simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally, until ribs are done.

Transfer ribs to a plate and top with rib sauce. Serve hot.

{ Lovely Internet 8.15.14 }

August 14, 2014

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1. Shark Week is a lie.

2. The Aging Myth.

3. A farmer’s perspective on our obsession with small-scale farms.

4. I love this.

5. Honor their unicorn.

6. Encyclopedia of Southern Food.

7. “I am a white privileged lady not a car lol”

8. I don’t need any more water bottles (it’s a problem) but I like the idea of cold water (or wine!) for 12 hours! My biggest hurdle with hydration is probably tepid water.

9. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown (also) (and this)

10. Legend. (also) (and, this too, on why you shouldn’t romanticize suicide) (and finally, this).

p.s. What White People Can Do- “We need to lock arms amidst all of this. If the police feel they are above the law with any one group, they will feel they are above the law with others. We need to learn from the civil rights movement. It wasn’t just black folks, it was everybody, because it wasn’t a black problem it was a moral issue. We are remembering 40 years after the Freedom Summer. That wasn’t just black people risking their lives, it was a community that went down to Mississippi because they knew that when any group within the nation is marginalized then we can’t be the nation we want to be.” 

For more tidbits from Elena the person, follow me on twitter (@elenabrent or @biscuitsandsuch), instagrampinterest or facebook. Subscribe to my bloglovin’ feed to make sure you never miss a post. Follow along with MissElenaeous for thoughts on everything other than Southern food.

{ 10/100: Blue Crab Stuffed Dolphin Fish }

August 9, 2014

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In the 1950′s the men of the Hillsborough Volunteer Fire Department decided to build a house in Morehead City, a getaway from the families where they could play cards and do whatever men in the 50′s did away from their families. Man stuff. Drinking brown liquor and smoking cigars like country versions of Mad Men characters. That house (and the one that replaced it after hurricane Hazel swept through in 1954), called lovingly by our extended family as “The Cottage” has been used as a vacation house by the descendents of the firemen (all of whom are part of our extended family) in the years since it was built. Like my dad and uncle and their cousins before us, my siblings and I grew up visiting Morehead City each summer, swimming in the marsh, fishing off the pier, boating over to Shackleford and Cape Lookout, buying books and candy at City News.

EPSON MFP image

EPSON MFP image

the Hillsborough Volunteer Fire Department, 1950′s. 

The summer after my dad graduated from the University of Richmond he and his friends came down to Morehead to hang out and unwind. According to the Capt’n after waking up and seeing the house in the light of day one of his friends exclaimed “what you’ve got here is a damn swamp house.” The house, which is situated on stilts over a low salt water marsh (not a swamp), is a structure that could only have been built before the CAMA and has stood strongly up to thunderstorm after hurricane. It has, affectionately, been called the Swamp House by our family ever since (the extended family, however, maintains that it should be called The Cottage).

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the swamp house during a particularly high tide the week of our wedding, september 2009

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shackleford banks ponies

Carteret County is surrounded by Craven and Pamlico counties to the north, Hyde county to the northeast, Onslow county to the southwest, and Jones county to the northwest. Its county seat is Beaufort and it includes Cape Lookout National Seashore, Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge, and the Croatan National Forest.

 

carteret

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The Swamp House sits on Calico Creek, which feeds into Calico Bay, the Morehead City Channel, the Beaufort Inlet, and finally the Atlantic Ocean. Growing up I mucked in the marsh, water skied in Calico Bay, stalked many a pony on the Cape Lookout National Seashore, and spent countless afternoons sitting on the bow of the boat as dad made us troll through a pack of birds diving into the waters with fishing lines cast. Later, once dad and I (and eventually most of the family) completed our SCUBA certification we explored the waters inshore and offshore in a whole new way, rolling off the sides of our 20″ Robolo onto the decks of shipwrecks. In 2009 Dan and I were married in Beaufort, the town just over the bridge from Morehead City, and in 2011 my parents moved to MHC fulltime so that my dad could devote himself fully to his dive business, Tortuga Charters.

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This is all to say that Morehead, as much as any other place in North Carolina, is dear to me. Driving into town on 1-70 still gives me a giddy feeling, even though it’s a drive I do more often now than ever before. Sitting on the back porch of the Swamp House, drinking a cocktail and shootin’ the shit, I am my most happy, my most at peace. It’s a little slice of heaven, Carteret County, which is why it was near impossible to pick one recipe, one story, one moment to encapsulate it for the Tasting North Carolina series.

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Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

dan & i the morning of our wedding, beaufort, september 2009

In fact, I put off choosing a recipe for almost two years because the task seemed too daunting. But then, as most things do, it all came together perfectly, falling into place like the puzzles my family love to do at the Swamp House’s big family dinner table. This year we headed up to Morehead in early June for the Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament, an annual big game sports fishing tournament held in Morehead City. My sister Lauren and her husband Bradley came up from New Orleans and spent a few days with us in Wilmington before we all headed to Morehead for a nice long weekend.

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Saturday and Sunday we partook in some of our favorite Carteret County activities- floating in the waves at Radio Island, eating clam pizza at Beach Bumz, fishing and crabbing off the pier, floating on le tube in Calico Creek, grabbing a drink at Queen Anne’s Revenge (and dinner at their sister restaurant in Tight Lines in Morehead), bar crawling along the water front. It was relaxing and reminded me how lovely it can be to just unwind with family, just be together and enjoy each other’s company.

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One of the things on Bradley’s wish list for as long as we’ve known him has been a deep sea fishing trip. Growing up we used to go out fishing with Capt’n Fred, but I hadn’t been fishing offshore in years (I prefer to look at the fish through the lens of my prescription mask), so I was excited to get out there. That Monday, the first day of the Big Rock Tournament, we woke up earlier than any human should, loaded the boat up with refreshments, and headed out to catch us some dolphin fish (not the mammal; the fish often referred to as mahi is called “dolphinfish” in these parts).  It was a big day. Thanks to our guaranteed anti-seasickness formula (cold fried chicken, pickled okra, salt n’ vinegar chips, cold beer) we all fared pretty well, and we all had the opportunity to reel in a few big fish. When it was all said and done we headed home with ten good size dolphin fish and a bonito tuna (also known as a lil’ tunie, according to my dad. As in “what the hell kinda fish is that?” “well, that right there’s a lil’ tunie!”). Thanks to the Capt’n for taking us out on Tortuga and his incredible mate Randy who kicked major ass despite having a serious leg wound, we came off the boats exhausted and thrilled with our haul.

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While we were on the boat we passed the time listening to the radio station that was giving updates on the tournament. Lines went in the water at 9am (it takes about 2-3 hours to get out to where the big fish live around the Big Rock), and shortly thereafter a boat called Inspiration hooked up a marlin. All day as the announcer on the radio would give the latest and greatest they would end with “and Inspiration is still hooked up.” After hours of hearing that the boat was still hooked on the same fish, we were having a hard time believing it. They couldn’t have seriously been reeling in the same fish for 3, 4, 5 hours, could they? They could. Right after 3pm the radio crackled again to announce that Inspiration had brought a blue marlin on board that they estimated weighed 600lbs.

Dolphin Fishing from Elena Rosemond-Hoerr on Vimeo.

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After showering and getting dressed we rushed downtown to the weigh station to see this fish for ourselves. We edged our way to the front of the crowd just as they were hoisting the marlin up in the weigh station. When the number was read, nobody could believe it- the fish weighed in at 754.3 lbs. It’s hard to describe just how gigantic that fish was and what a sight it was to see in person. This was the third largest marlin ever caught in the tournament, and the largest this century. Inspiration ended up winning the tournament on the first day, with the second largest fish weighing in over a hundred and fifty pounds less than the winning fish.

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We spent a lot of time that night over dinner talking about how we would prepare our bounty of dolphin fish. Lauren and Bradley left the next morning, taking a huge bag of dolphin steaks home with them, and a few days later my brother Ryan and some friends from college joined us. One night we decided to make the meal we’d been scheming up with Lauren and Bradley- dolphin fish stuffed with the crabs Bradley had been courting off the back pier all week.

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In reality, our little crab trap off the pier didn’t catch enough crab to feed all of us, so we supplemented with crab from the market. The dolphin fish, stuffed with spiced crab and roasted in a butter and wine sauce and served with cilantro lime rice and a fresh spinach salad, was the epitome of fresh local seafood. It was made even sweeter by the fact that we had caught the dolphin, walked the crab trap into the marsh, enjoyed it together at the big family table at the Swamp House that holds so many memories.

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me, the morning of our wedding, beaufort, september 2009

Blue Crab Stuffed Dolphin Fish
serves 4

4 dolphin steaks

2 cups crab meat

2 garlic cloves

1 stick butter

4 shallots

1 cup dry white wine

Juice of 2 lemons

1 tsp cayenne pepper

1 tsp sea salt, plus more for finishing

1 tsp black pepper

Green onions

In a large skillet, melt butter over medium low heat. Add in white wine, minced garlic, and sliced shallots. Simmer 20 minutes.

In a bowl mix together crab meat, cayenne pepper, salt, black pepper, and lemon juice.  Mix half of butter and wine mixture into crab. Heat oven to 375F.

Cut a slit in each dolphin filet that goes down to the base but does not cut in half and transfer to a baking sheet that is at least 1″ deep. Stuff each filet with 1/4 of the crab mixture. Top fillets with remaining butter/wine mixture. Top with sliced green onions. Bake for 20 minutes or until the fish is flaky and the crab is browned. Top with fresh green onions and serve hot.