{ Muscadine Hull Pie }

September 8, 2014

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It’s muscadine season! That wild grape that has inspired hundreds of years of Southern jams, jellies, preserves, pies, and wines is back in the markets and ready for your kitchen.

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I decided to try my hand at a muscadine hull pie. Traditionally a way to use the hulls when the pulp and juice were being used in other recipes, the hull pie epitomizes the thrifty and frugal country recipe.

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hull pie 2

When they’re cooked down muscadines have a sweet and tart flavor that is similar to cherries. I decided to use the whole grape, pitting them first, which made for a filling that perfect complimented my buttery crust. What a treat. I think I’ll need to replicate this before the end of muscadine season!

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Muscadine Hull Pie

filling

4 cups whole muscadines

1/2 cup brown sugar

Juice of 1 lemon

Pinch of salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

crust

2 1/2 cups flour

2 sticks cold butter

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup cold water

1 egg

1 tbsp brown sugar

In a food processor combine flour, butter, sugar, and salt. Pulse until texture resembles cornmeal. Add in water, a few tablespoons at a time. Pulse until a dough ball forms, adding more water as needed. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill.

Remove tops from muscadines and squeeze the pulp out. Remove the seeds and combine pulp and hulls in a pot over medium-low heat. Stir in brown sugar, lemon juice, salt, and vanilla. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until filling has thickened.

Flour a work surface and roll out half your dough. Drape over a pie crust and stir in filling. Roll out remaining half and lay over top of the filling. Fold the edges of the bottom dough over the top crust and press together. Brush top with egg and sprinkle with brown sugar. Bake at 350F for 40-45 minutes or until crust is golden brown and flakey. Serve hot.

 

 

{ Lovely Internet 9.5.14 }

September 5, 2014

9.5.14

1. This 127 year old woman thanks chocolate for her long life. (Grammy, that’s great news! You’re on the right track!)

2. Queen Anne’s Lace, the Wild Mother of Carrot

3. Lady vikings!

4. I am tall, and the vast majority of my height is in my legs. So that means that a reclined seat in front of me on a flight causes me physical pain. Should I actually have to pay more because you want to recline two inches?

5. Did you know North Carolina is the only state to have an official toast?

6. I don’t usually spend a lot of time watching youtube, but I can’t stop watching Anna Akana videos.

7. We’re focusing on the wrong thing.

8. THIS IS SO DEPRESSING. Literally.

9. “Hugh is a really decent person in ways that can be really really irritating.”

10. So you want to be a food writer.

For more tidbits from Elena the person, follow me on twitter (@elenabrent or @biscuitsandsuch), instagrampinterest or facebook. Subscribe to my bloglovin’ feed to make sure you never miss a post. Follow along with MissElenaeous for thoughts on everything other than Southern food.

{ Shrimp Po’ Boys }

August 31, 2014

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In the spirit of Labor Day I am taking this weekend to do absolutely no work. That’s not true, actually, but I am doing significantly less work than I do on a normal weekend and I have spent the past two days at the beach, floating in the waves, working on my tan sunburn. It has been glorious. I am in heaven.

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Earlier this week the mornings were crisp and the days had a real sense of fall about them. When the heat and mugginess returned on Friday everyone complained, but I was thrilled. Mugginess = summer and I am not ready for summer to end. I will relish all the heat and humidity the world wants to throw my way for the next month because I know all too soon I’ll be floating in a down jacket instead of in the marsh. So with that, I give you a summer sandwich I never want to stop eating for the summer days I never want to end. Po’ boys and 110% humidity forever.

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Shrimp Po’ Boys
from my cookbook, The American Cookbook

2 loaves French bread

One ripe red tomato

8 pieces of bib lettuce

shrimp:

2 dozen shrimp

1 cup/ 130g flour

1 tsp paprika

½ tsp cayenne

½ tsp salt

1 cup panko/ 70g or breadcrumbs

Peanut oil for frying

remoulade:

1 cup/ 220g mayonnaise

¼ cup/ 125g mustard

Juice from ½ lemon

1 oz pickle brine or apple cider vinegar

1 tsp paprika

1 tbsp creamed horseradish

Heat oil to 375F.  Mix together flour, paprika, cayenne, salt, and breadcrumbs.

Rinse and peel shrimp. Dip shrimp in breading and fry for 3-4 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool on rack.

Combine mayonnaise, mustard, brine, paprika, horseradish, and lemon juice. Smear French bread with remoulade and layer sliced tomatoes, lettuce, and fried shrimp.